IBM said usage of Adobe AI tools in marketing improved efficiency

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IBM said usage of Adobe AI tools in marketing improved efficiency
IBM said usage of Adobe AI tools in marketing improved efficiency

International Business Machines revealed that its initial testing of Adobe’s generative artificial intelligence (AI) capabilities yielded productivity increases.

International Business Machines (IBM.N) announced on Wednesday that its initial testing of Adobe’s (ADBE.O) generative artificial intelligence (AI) capabilities had resulted in productivity gains.

IBM stated that it was employing Adobe’s technologies, which can create graphics from text-based cues, to assist with marketing initiatives. It is an early test of Adobe’s aim to construct AI systems educated on its own proprietary data with legal protections against lawsuits, which the company hopes will entice large enterprises.

Billy Seabrook, global chief design officer for IBM’s consulting arm, stated that the 1,600 designers in his business used Adobe’s tools to swiftly produce ideas and create variants of them for use in various aspects of marketing campaigns.

“What typically would take us two weeks for an end-to-end cycle, we’ve gotten down to two days,” Seabrook said.

Overall, IBM anticipates designers’ productivity to increase tenfold, allowing them to spend more time brainstorming and constructing storyboards rather than generating minor design versions.

Seabrook stated that in the short run, the most likely impact of the new technologies on design sector employment will be the use of current teams to complete additional work.

“There’s usually a rule of prioritizing which big bets to pursue and how much staff to devote to a particular challenge. In theory, you’re freeing up more time to address some of those other issues,” he explained.

The long-term effects on employment are less evident. According to Seabrook, recent IBM survey results suggest that most corporate leaders believe designers are more crucial than ever.

“They have to be almost the tastemakers and the quality checkers of the output of the generative AI, as well as a little bit of the empathy in the room that helps train, fine-tune, and curate that AI,” Seabrook told me.

But in other portions of the poll data, “everyone agrees there are going to be fewer jobs,” Seabrook said. “We’re waiting to see what happens.”

Also readThe Road Ahead: Predictions for the Future Evolution of Artificial Intelligence

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