Youth need digital literacy skills in order to connect with friends and family, learn online, and prepare for great futures, says Tejas Shah, Head IT Applications at Prince Pipes and Fittings Ltd.

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Youth need digital literacy skills in order to connect with friends and family, learn online, and prepare for great futures, says Tejas Shah, Head IT Applications at Prince Pipes and Fittings Ltd.
Youth need digital literacy skills in order to connect with friends and family, learn online, and prepare for great futures, says Tejas Shah, Head IT Applications at Prince Pipes and Fittings Ltd.

Now that digital literacy is all over the classroom, it can help young minds to expand and extend their use of technology for creativity and self-expression and to develop a greater understanding of the complexities of what they’re doing

This is an exclusive interview conducted by the Editor Team of CIO News with Tejas Shah, Head IT Applications at Prince Pipes and Fittings Ltd.

What is digital literacy, and why does it matter?

Digital literacy essentially means that a person is capable of living, learning, and working in a digital environment.

Literacy skills have always been important. Let’s take one basic example:

In centuries past, people communicated via letters. These letters soon turned into telegraph messages. From there, we advanced to the telephone, the internet, and then text messaging via phone. Today’s options for communication far outweigh those of the past generation or two. “Children learn these skills as part of their lives, like language, which they learn without realising they are learning.”

As an IT leader, what are your views on digitally upskilling the youth in the post-COVID era?

Digital literacy is one component for youth, who utilise technology to interact with the world around them.

Today’s youth are making history. As the first full generation of digital natives, they are growing up surrounded by ever-advancing technology such as personal computers, the internet, smartphones, social media, virtual reality, and more.

More than ever, digital creativity is empowering youth to excel in school and careers, as well as promote global change.

Youth need digital literacy skills in order to connect with friends and family, learn online, and prepare for great futures.

How can the youth be digitally empowered? What kind of exposure and engagement opportunities in the educational curriculum can educational institutes implement to raise the interest of youths in upgrading their digital skills?

I’ve heard from some of the schools and universities that they are focused on helping students embrace creativity and master the essential 21st century skill of digital literacy through their programme offerings.

Schools are also being encouraged to incorporate ICT into all subject areas across the primary and secondary curriculum. Now that digital literacy is all over the classroom, it can help young minds to expand and extend their use of technology for creativity and self-expression and to develop a greater understanding of the complexities of what they’re doing. Initially, computer class was the only subject in school; however, schools and universities have begun to offer advanced courses, including many startups that offer online courses such as coding and so on.

Should it become a must for schools, colleges, and other educational institutes to conduct workshops or crash-course programmes to drive home the importance of technology for businesses?

Yes, in fact, many have already started to be in line for the ever-growing demand.

As an IT leader, what advice would you give to the youth considering a career in the technology industry? What should they know about the industry before starting their career? What challenges they could face in and how do they overcome the challenges?

One recent article stated that a nine-year-old boy of Indian origin, whose father hails from Tamil Nadu, has become the youngest Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist.

I would recommend all the youth start exploring options in terms of tech—designing, coding, computer programmes, RPA/automations like BOTS, and low-code application design.

And this is starting to become an area of interest, and accordingly, they may go more in-depth on the technology they like to work on as per an individual’s interest.

He highlighted to keep exploring and learning.

Also readLearn relevant tech skills and gain experience

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